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Our very own, Brad Poziembo, was recently featured on PBS Career Connections.

Hear how a trip abroad put Brad on his career path and how emerging 3D printing technology allows him to improve the quality of life for more of his patients.

Dayton Artificial Limb Clinic patient Reggie Showers – a bilateral amputee who became a world champion motorcycle drag racer and world record holder, pilot, and certified snowboard instructor – inspires others with limb loss to try scuba diving March 23, 2013, at Wright State University.

Reggie Showers Featured in WKEF Story

Reggie Showers Featured in WDTN Story

Our Year in Review report captures a few of the many highlights of 2012 at Dayton Artificial Limb Clinic. Chances are you either have played a part, or been touched in some way, by at least one of these stories of progress.

We invite you to check out just how far we came last year – (even to the London Paralympics!) – and stay tuned about where we’re going this year.

2012 DALC Year in Review ReportINSIDE:

  • Comfortable prosthesis made her mobile: Determined traveler set to vacation again in 2013
  • ‘Yoga for Amputees’ training goes beyond traditional physical therapy
  • PDI built rowing seat for U.S. bronze medalist
  • Dayton Artificial Limb Clinic ahead on accountability
  • After 3 decades on crutches, he’s finally on 2 legs
  • Rehabilitating people with limb loss requires specialized training for PTs
  • PDI makes devices stronger, lighter, more comfortable
  • Co-op program helps keep projects moving
Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (DALC YIR 2012-FNL_revised final_archive.pdf)2012: Year in ReviewDownload the 2012: Year in Review3729 Kb

Our Year in Review report captures a few of the many highlights of 2011 at Dayton Artificial Limb Clinic. Chances are you either have played a part, or been touched in some way, by at least one of these stories of progress.

We invite you to check out just how far we came last year and stay tuned about where we’re going this year.

2011 DALC Year in Review ReportINSIDE:

  • Three years of R&D produce breakthrough for Trotwood bowler
  • Prosthetic mobile lab logs 8500 miles in 2011
  • Dayton Artificial Limb Clinic celebrates 15th anniversary
  • Physical therapy and new artificial leg help woman walk for the first time in 22 years
  • Peer-reviewed journal published case report on DALC patient Allen Spoltman
Attachments:
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (DALC_2011_YIR_Archive_FINAL.pdf)2011: Year in ReviewDownload the 2011: Year in Review4622 Kb

‘I walk a whole lot better’

Don McElroy, 52, of Trotwood, barely remembers life without an artificial left leg – he’s had one since age 5. But in 2008, he told his prosthetist, Tracy Slemker of Dayton Artificial Limb Clinic, that walking long distances was getting tougher.

Right-handed Don McElroy slides on his right leg since he has an artificial left leg. His new prosthesis will make bowling more comfortable, he says.“Fatigue hits, and I have to rest,” Don said. “It just takes more energy to move that left leg.”

That’s a problem for Don, who plays tennis and basketball, rides a stationary bike, and takes on yard work and house projects. Plus, he’s a serious bowler.

“I have always competed with the best of the bowlers,” said Don, who’s shot 28 perfect games “and six 800 series, with 877 my highest.” That score is close to a perfect 900 series – three perfect games in a row.

So the clinic and its sister company, Prosthetic Design, Inc. (PDI) of Clayton, began research and development (R&D) on a new prosthesis for Don. He’s among the world’s most difficult patients to fit, Tracy said, since his amputation was performed on an atypically shaped limb because of a congenital condition also affecting his hip joint and surrounding muscles.

“Improvements came in small bits and pieces and accumulated into something much bigger,” Tracy said. “You don’t fit a patient like Donny off the shelf. Everything was custom.”

Staff marveled at Don’s patience. “He never once got frustrated,” said Rob Hoskins, the prosthetic engineer and clinical consultant handling the parts fabrication, working closely with PDI staff.

Finally, after 150 appointments; hundreds of liners, seals and socket iterations; and almost 50 people working on the solution, a breakthrough came in 2011.

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